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Great Women Scholars: Yetta Goodman, Maxine Greene, Louise Rosenblatt, Margaret Meek Spencer

Reading as a transactional process, reader-response, the ways texts teach, miscue analysis, kid watching, social responsibility and imagination, our existential existence, I am not yet, not yet, are all ideas that are part of who we are, but would not be without Yetta Goodman, Maxine Greene, Louise Rosenblatt, and Margaret Meek Spencer.

On Friday, September 21st 2001, ten days after 9-11, Yetta, Maxine, Louise, and Margaret spoke about their lives and work, what makes teaching sublime, and about the dark side of imagination. To keep hope alive, to continue to imagine life as it could be otherwise, and for the sake of future generations and ourselves, it is important that we read what they had to say and continue to learn from them.

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“The point of being incomplete,” Maxine continued, “feeling like I am no nearer an answer, is that I do philosophy. And philosophy doesn’t have to do with answers, it has to do with questions, and most of the questions are unanswerable empirically, logically. It means more questions, like: ‘What is beauty?’ ‘What is justice?’ ‘What is freedom?’ There are no empirical answers to any of those.

Maxine Greene

“Mutual aid, my father’s whole point was that the struggle for survival was not the only thing that happened in evolution,” Louise said. “There was mutual aid. There was cooperation. There was care and fidelity among animals as well as among humans.”

Louise Rosenblatt

“One strand of the Faulkner experience has remained with me,” she said. “Most of my research included huge inputs by thinkers like Piaget, Vygotsky, Bruner, and the French philosophers, who are the other non-English strand of my thinking. But although I had to study linguistics, from Saussure on, I never gave up teaching poetry and literature generally.”

Margaret Meek Spencer

“That’s what it took,” Yetta said. “I tell students to stop and look at the things that they think are the most negative about themselves and to ask how can they can use those things in positives ways, as strengths. The negative things that we take for granted are also our strengths. That’s what I began to learn, little by little.

Yetta Goodman

GARN PRESS

DENNY TAYLOR (EDITOR OF GREAT WOMEN SCHOLARS)

Denny Taylor has organized more than 30 international scholars forums. She speaks to diverse national and international audiences on a broad range of issues, especially the interconnections between the rapid acceleration in climate change and the dismantling of US public schools, which are not widely recognized. Taylor is particularly interested in bringing to the attention of the public what many parents and teachers already know, which is that in the US, children are being taught to work for the corporations that are using up Earth’s resources, contaminating the planet, and causing the climate system to adversely change, making Earth and unsafe place for our kids to be.

In 1983, Taylor published Family Literacy, which is regarded a classic in the field; Growing Up Literate received the MLA Shaughnessy award in 1988; and Toxic Literacies, published in 1996, was nominated for both the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Award. In 2004, Taylor was inducted into the IRA’s Reading Hall of Fame. She is Professor Emerita of Literacy Studies at Hofstra University, and the co-founder and CEO of Garn Press.

Her most recent books are Nineteen Clues: Great Transformations Can Be Achieved Through Collective Action, Save Our Children, Save Our School, Pearson Broke the Golden Rule, Rosie’s Umbrella, and Rat-a-tat-tat! I’ve Lost My Cat!

Denny Taylor

Denny Taylor

Introduced and Edited

In 1983, Denny Taylor published Family Literacy, which is regarded a classic in the field; Growing Up Literate received the MLA Shaughnessy award in 1988; and Toxic Literacies, published in 1996, was nominated for both the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Award. In 2004, Taylor was inducted into the IRA’s Reading Hall of Fame.

Video: Yetta Goodman

Yetta M. Goodman is Regents Professor of Education at the University of Arizona. She consults with education departments and speaks at conferences throughout the United States and in many nations of the world regarding issues of language, teaching and learning with implications for language arts curricula. In addition to her research in early literacy, miscue analysis and in exploring reading and writing processes, she has popularized the term kidwatching encouraging teachers to be professional observers of the language and learningdevelopment of their students. She is a major spokesperson for whole language and in her extensive writing shows concern for educational issues and research with a focus on classrooms, students and teachers.

Video: Maxine Greene

Maxine Greene is a professor emeritus and the Founder and Director of the Center for Social Imagination, the Arts and Education at Teachers College, Columbia University. She is a past president of the Philosophy of Education Society, the American Educational Studies Association, and the American Educational Research Association. Also a member of the National Academy of Education and the recipient of nine honorary degrees, Greene has lectured widely at universities and educational associations nationwide. An Educator of the Year at Columbia University and Ohio State University, Dr. Greene has authored six books.

Great Women Scholars Photo Gallery

Reading as a transactional process, reader-response, the ways texts teach, miscue analysis, kid watching, social responsibility and imagination, our existential existence, I am not yet, not yet, are all ideas that are part of who we are, but would not be without Yetta Goodman, Maxine Greene, Louise Rosenblatt, and Margaret Meek Spencer.

Related Great Women Scholars News

Reading as a transactional process, reader-response, the ways texts teach, miscue analysis, kid watching, social responsibility and imagination, our existential existence, I am not yet, not yet, are all ideas that are part of who we are, but would not be without Yetta Goodman, Maxine Greene, Louise Rosenblatt, and Margaret Meek Spencer. On Friday, September 21st 2001, ten days after 9-11, Yetta, Maxine, Louise, and Margaret spoke about their lives and work, what makes teaching sublime. To keep hope alive, to continue to imagine life as it could be otherwise, and for the sake of future generations and ourselves, it is important that we read what they had to say and continue to learn from them.

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