Imagination and the Human Spirit

At Garn Press we thrive on the challenges that such problems create. We encourage our writers and readers to dare big thoughts, to agree and to disagree, but always to keep in mind the extraordinary gift we all share of imagination and the human spirit.

 

IMAGINATION AND THE HUMAN SPIRIT

At Garn Press, we are convinced that actionable knowledge to address some of the great questions about human life depends on nurturing the imagination and human spirit. Through the arts people are inspired to act.

For Garn Press, science, literature, art, and philosophy are not separate categories. They are intricately connected, and through these connections it is possible for us to get a larger sense of life, with a clarity of vision that would not be possible otherwise.

It is only in the past few hundred years in the sciences that our bodies have been separated from our heads. We have been taught falsely that if we cannot measure it, it isn’t science, that truth is objective, and that facts can be proven and indisputable. Not so at Garn. At Garn Press we are convinced that without art the sciences have the creativity sucked out of them. Most scientists and artists get this, even though most policy makers do not. Similar to Italo Calvino, Garn’s stance is that science, literature, philosophy and art create epicenters of creativity, vortexes of energy, and an aesthetic experience, that provides insights science or art alone cannot.

Jim Gee’s Blowing Out The Candles does that for us. When we read his poems the world doesn’t change, what changes is the way we perceive it. Not only that, each time we return to them we find something new. The beautiful fine line drawing by Malia Hughes of the ruin of the monastery in which Gee spent his youth becomes etched in memory, along with the line “Sometimes we secretly waited for the delivery man and begged for bread”.

Similarly, in Rosie’s Umbrella, which Gee calls “a gripping, page-turning, wild ride, fuelled by great passion, deep humanity, and an urgent call for justice”, there are always new awakenings.

In the novel Rosie is determined to find out about her family, and in a life and death struggle that fuses past and present she discovers her own truth in a heroic journey of self-discovery. Key to understanding Rosie is the idea that when there is a death or near death experience “we must seek amongst the ashes for new perspectives and new birth. It’s important that we are creative and adapt”.

Garn’s imprint Imagination and the Human Spirit is about creativity and adaptation. It’s about that synergy, beyond words, beyond images. It’s about coming face to face with the reality of the world and questioning that reality, being mindful, awake, and not rushing to judgment or accepting the most obvious answer. It means dreaming of a better world and making a commitment to that possibility.

Ken Goodman’s novel The Smart One: A Grandfather’s Tale, does just that. By Duvid’s side we witness, through the eyes of a nine year old boy, the strike for a 12-hour day on May Day 1904 and the 1905 Revolution in Smorgon in Vilnius, a district in Lithuania. We feel with him and his family the heart wrenching distress at what happened to members of his family who participated in the workers’ resistance movement.

In such circumstances actionable knowledge becomes the activity. At Garn Press our commitment both to social action and to nurturing the imagination and the human spirit is deeply embedded in the way we make our paper and digital books. At our independent press we consider creating eBooks an art form, and we are artisan apprentices. We focus on lettering as design, illustration as visual essay, and photography as poetry. In addition to producing these Garn books in paperback and hardcover, we are also producing them in a digital space as platform-agnostic digital eBooks for all tablets, ebook readers, and smartphones.

At Garn Press we thrive on the challenges that such problems create. We encourage our writers and readers to dare big thoughts, to agree and to disagree, but always to keep in mind the extraordinary gift we all share of imagination and the human spirit.

 

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This

Share this post with your friends!